Winter at Cylburn

Winter China Fir

Happy Holidays! In a few days it will officially be winter. The gardens have been put to bed and tender plants moved to warm quarters. The CAA staff is still working on the grounds but in the coming months activities will shift indoors to perusing seed and plant catalogues and preparing for the spring. That doesn’t mean there isn’t anything to see at Cylburn! There are plenty of plants and trees that choose the “off” season to show their stuff. Here are just a few to look for on your next winter hike here.

December Cylburn Hawthorn TreeCrataegus viridis ‘Winter King’ (‘Winter King’ Southern Hawthorn)

The brilliant red berries on this cultivar of our native Hawthorn make it a show-stopper. ‘Winter King’ is loved for its fragrant white blooms in spring and its thornless stems, making it much kinder to the gardener than the traditional thorny Hawthorns. Find a group of five ‘Winter Kings’ at the southwest corner of the lower Vollmer parking lot.

 

December Cylburn WinterberryIlex verticilatta ‘Red Sprite’ (Winterberry)

This deciduous holly is known for its large, vividly red berries, a favorite with our birds. ‘Red Sprite’ is a female cultivar of the native winterberry, easily grown in sun or semi-sunny locations, adaptable to very wet soil conditions. It fruits well if a male pollinizer such as ‘Jim Dandy’ is nearby. Find ours on the south side of the Larrabee Garden.

December Cylburn HollyIlex x koehneana ‘Ruby’ (Koehne Holly)

‘Ruby’ is a cultivar Koehne holly, a cross between Ilex aquifolium and I. latifolia. The shiny dark green leaves make Koehne hollies an attractive choice when a large dense holly is desired (it typically grows to over 15’ and is almost as wide). The clusters of berries on an attractive pyramidal shape are widely admired. Plant this and other evergreen hollies in full sun. Cylburn’s ‘Ruby’ is located on the east side of the East Oval Holly Collection, near several other Koehne cultivars.

December Cylburn JuniperJuniperus virginiana ‘Grey Owl’ (Red Cedar)

The beautiful blue-grey foliage of this native cedar shows off prolific bluish berries in the late fall and early winter. Native to this region, this easily grown conifer is an excellent landscaping choice for a full sun location. Cylburn has a conifer collection in the woods, on the north side of the asphalt walkway near to the north ends of the greenhouses.

December Cylburn Scotch PinePinus sylvestris ‘Gold Coin’ (Scotch Pine)

This Scotch Pine is pyramidal with mint green foliage in the summer that turns bright golden yellow in the cooler temperatures of fall and winter. Plant this bright pine in full sun. Also a part of the Moudry Conifer Collection near the western end of the planting.

 

Winter is also a time to get close to the trees and appreciate things that may not be as noticeable in other seasons, like the texture and patterns on the bark. Two examples are the Ulmus parvifolia (Chinese Elm or Lacebark Elm) and the Lagerstroemia ‘Acoma’ (Crape Myrtle).

There’s no reason to wait until spring to come to Cylburn — The grounds are beautiful year round. Now they’re especially festive covered in fresh snow! On behalf of all of us at the Cylburn Arboretum Association, all the best for a wonderful winter.

 


SnowMansionTHANK YOU! We are grateful for the support we’ve received this year! The Cylburn Arboretum Association is the nonprofit friends group for Cylburn and we depend on the generosity of our donors, members, volunteers, sponsors and friends to enrich and enhance the arboretum for the community. To learn more about what a gift to the Cylburn Arboretum Association can do, click here. If you’d like to make a year-end donation, click here. Special thanks to our partners at Lifebridge Health for making our What’s in Bloom posters possible for visitors each month. They’ll direct you with maps on where to find the plants listed above and others each season. Hope to see you at Cylburn soon and thanks again!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s