Salvias Put on a Show

Salvias Put on a Show

As the weather gets cooler and some of summer’s flowers begin to fade, there’s one plant that continues to bloom abundantly well into the fall — Salvias. We have many varieties at Cylburn particularly in the gardens in front of the mansion where their colorful blossoms are busy with an array of pollinators. Salvia is the largest genus of plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae, with nearly 1000 species of shrubs, herbaceous perennials, and annuals. The name Salvia derives from the Latin salvere — to feel well and healthy, health, heal — referring to the herb’s healing properties. Salvia officinalis (Garden Sage or Common Sage) is widely used in cooking. Here are just a few of the Salvias to keep an eye out for on your next visit to Cylburn.

August Salvia RosebudSalvia involucrata (Rosebud Sage) — This perennial Salvia blooms from July up to frost and is a favorite of hummingbirds. Fast growing, it can reach over 6 feet. The showy pink-red flowers are born on red stems, adding to the interest.

August Salvia Blue Arrow

Salvia sagittata (Arrow Leaf Salvia) — This tender perennial Salvia is native to the Andes (Chili and Peru) where it grows at much higher elevations. The bright, true blue flowers make it a stand-out in the garden. The flowers are quite sticky!

August Salvia Ember's Wish


Salvia x ‘Ember’s Wish’ — The distinctive coral flowers of this Salvia make it a star in the garden and attractive to birds and butterflies. A relatively new introduction, it blooms continuously with dead-heading or cutting back. Another special thing about this variety — A portion of the plant’s sale is donated to Australia’s Make-a-Wish Foundation for kids. This is also true of the ‘Love & Wishes’ variety (pictured below).

August Salvia Love and Wishes

Salvia ‘Amistad’ (Friendship Sage) — This Salvia is a tender perennial past Zone 8 but blooms so profusely from spring though autumn and is so colorful and exuberant that it is desirable even though it doesn’t winter over.

 

Salvia elegans ‘Golden Delicious’ has yellowish leaves that offset its deep red flowers.

August Salvia Yellow Leaves

There are many more Salvias to enjoy as you walk around the mansion gardens. You’ll see that you may not be the only one enjoying these flowers — The bees love them too!

Curious about How a Bee Thinks? Join us at 6pm on Wednesday, October 18 for a talk led by Baltimore City Master Gardener Michael Andorsky. He’ll cover honey bee intelligence, bee decision making, similarities between the bee swarm and the human brain, and what honey bees have taught engineers about designing robots.  More info here.

 

 

 

 

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The Gardens at Cylburn

The Gardens at Cylburn

In addition to rolling green space and thousands of trees, Cylburn is home to a wide variety of beautifully planted gardens displaying shrubs, perennials, and annuals.  From the “named” gardens that honor those who have played important roles in both Cylburn’s and Baltimore’s history to the colorful plantings that enhance the Mansion and other points around the grounds, each garden offers a collection of colors and textures that delight visitors. Many of the plantings are tagged for information. The Cylburn Arboretum Association’s gardeners and volunteers help to make sure the gardens are gorgeous year round. Here are a few to look out for the next time you visit.

The Mansion & Front Circle Gardens

These gardens are designed to be colorful showcases for perennials, annuals, tropicals and shrubs that thrive in full sun. The Mansion circle contains not only gardens but an ingeniuos planting of Lagerstroemia (Crape or Crepe Myrtle) that align perfectly from any angle. In summer their bright pink flowers are striking.

The Nathans, Larrabee and Worthley Gardens

Each of these memorial gardens has a distinctive character. The Worthley garden is a botanist’s delight with a variety of plantings of succulents, cacti, conifers and grasses, as well as perennials and annuals.

The Nathans Garden is shady and peaceful oasis, inviting on even the hottest day. Both the gazebo and bench located there are a favorite spot for visitors to sit and enjoy lunch or a book.

The Larabee Garden features plants chosen to provide habitat for birds and butterflies and includes a small pond.

The Shady Garden, All American Selections, and Formal Gardens.

Nestled directly behind the Mansion is a small “shady” garden that is fenced in. It contains a unique set of plants along a path sheltered by a large Cryptomeria. Between the back of the mansion and Cylburn’s Carriage House (currently closed with plans for renovation underway) you can find the All American Selections garden as well as other beds with an array of flowers and herbs. This time of year the blooms are plentiful and the dahlia and canna are notably gorgeous. If you’re lucky you might catch hummingbirds and other birds, bees and butterflies there. Look to your right as you face the Carriage House and you’ll see the Formal Garden, a lovely place to walk and enjoy the colorful symmetry of flowers and foliage.

The Julie Smith, Three Sisters, and Ryer Gardens

The Julie Smith and Three Sisters gardens are located along the path from the mansion to the greenhouses. They are quiet and shady with plants chosen to thrive at woodland’s edge. There is always something interesting in bloom there and stone benches offer a place to rest and reflect. The Ryer garden is similarly shady and planted at the woodland’s edge. It is located behind the Vollmer Center where the trails lead into the woods.

The Rain Garden

Located by the greenhouses, classrooms, and employee parking lot, you’ll find the Bay-Wise-certified rain garden. It features a variety native plants that can withstand both drought and wet conditions. This garden captures rainwater runoff from the hard surfaces and sends it to the adjoining forest where it will infiltrate and be purified in the process. A rain garden addresses the issues of storm water runoff and water pollution. and stops the water from reaching the sewer system. It also provides habitat. Ours is always bustling with bees and butterflies.

These are just a few of the gardens at Cylburn. There are beautiful plantings, flowers, trees and shrubs throughout the grounds and around all of the buildings. Wherever you walk, look for the tags that identify many of the trees and flowers.