Summer’s in bloom!

Summer’s in bloom!

In addition to trees and pathways, trails and the mansion, there are many gardens at Cylburn with a variety of flowers of all kinds. In fact, Cylburn is classified as an arboretum, but is also one of Baltimore’s marquee public gardens. Summer is peak time for many of the beauties to be discovered on the grounds. Here are just a few you’ll find blooming now.

June Foxtail Lily 3

Eremurus sp. (Foxtail Lily)

This striking plant bears a tall stalk of yellow/orange-ish indeterminate flowers (“indeterminate” meaning that the flowers open from the base up, in contrast to “determinate” flowers which open from the top down).  This planting of Foxtail Lily bulbs attracts more “What IS that flower?” questions than most of the others.

Where: Across from the Mansion Circle, next to a weeping beech.

June Larkspur CloseupConsolida ajacis (Larkspur)

These bright blue and pink spikes are show-stoppers. Considered to be an annual alternative to delphinium, which struggles in this climate, the larkspur is an enthusiastic bloomer, and re-seeds itself every year. Larkspur is the “Flower of the Month” for July evoking feelings of joy, levity and love.

Where: Find them in the Mansion Circle and the Worthley Garden.

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Weed)

This colorful native perennial is the sole host plant for Monarch butterflies, providing critical habitat for this endangered species.

Where: The orange variety can be found on the south edge of the Larrabee Garden and scattered other places. A less common yellow flowering cultivar ‘Mellow Yellow’ grows in the Mansion Circle.

June Butterfly Weed

June CactusOpuntia sp. (Cactus)

Bright yellow flowers prove that perennial cactus does grow and thrive in our non-desert climate! This one is surrounded by Sedum sexangulare (Stonecrop), a groundcover that can be found sprawling throughout many of Cylburn’s gardens.

Where: Find it in on the berm in the Worthley garden.

June Indian PinkSpigelia marilandica (Indian Pink)

This bright red and yellow native perennial grows in a large clump and is a favorite of hummingbirds. Although the genus name, Spigelia, honors Adrian van den Spiegel (1578-1625), a Flemish anatomist, the specific epithet, marilandica, means “of Maryland”.

Where: A large clump is found in front of the Vollmer Center, on the right as one faces the building. Also in the Larrabee Garden by the mansion.

 

June BetonyStachys densiflora ‘Hummelo’ (Betony)

This bright pink perennial has a long bloom season, from early June through July or even August. You can also find Stachys officinalis ‘Pink Cotton Candy’ by the Vollmer Center. Less well known that Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ears), these Stachys are well-behaved, dependable perennials with an orderly habit.

Where: In the Larrabee Garden by the mansion.

Whenever you visit Cylburn, keep an eye out for our What’s in Bloom posters. Thanks to our partners at Lifebridge Health for making these informative pieces possible for visitors. They’ll direct you with maps on where to find these flowers and others throughout the season. There are many gardens scattered throughout the grounds of Cylburn with more blossoms than can fit on one poster, so we hope you’ll explore! Find more info here. You may see our dedicated gardeners and volunteers out there planting, weeding or watering — They help to make all of this possible. We’re always looking for additional help so if you’re interested in joining our efforts you can find more information on how to volunteer here, or how to become a member here. Before you go, here are some more of this season’s blossoms!

 

Clockwise: Agastache rupestris (Threadleaf Giant Hyssop); Rudbeckia maxima (Great Coneflower); Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan); Hesperaloe parviflora (Red Yucca); Monarda ‘Jacob Cline’ (Bee Balm); Salvia ‘Purple rain’; Ratibida (Prairie Coneflower); Asiatic lily; Biker circling the Circle Garden; Hypericum calycinum (St. John’s Wort); and Mansion Garden.